Moment RAF Typhoon fighter jet kills ISIS jihadis with precision missiles after spotting thugs in bunker near Mosul


TWO RAF typhoon fighter jets killed ISIS jihadis in Iraq during a bombing blitz, say UK military bosses.

The Ministry of Defence (MoD) said the jets used precision missiles to wipe out heavily armed militants who were hiding out near the city of Mosul.

The ISIS group were hiding out nearby the city of Mosul

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The ISIS group were hiding out nearby the city of MosulCredit: Getty

The govenment deparment confirmed Iraqi security forces had come under heavy small arms fire from the terrorists on May 11.

The jihadi group were entrenched in a ‘strong defensive position’ near the city full of innocent civilians.

After encountering the group in a strong defensive position around 25 miles south west of the city of Mosul, Iraqi troops requested air support from the global coalition.

The MoD said a pair of RAF Typhoon FGR4s responded promptly and attacked the terrorists with two Paveway IV precision guided bombs.

The bombs hit the target and eliminated a number of IS fighters.

Following the air strike, Iraqi forces were then able to carry out an assault and overwhelm the few remaining terrorists, the MoD added.

The air strikes follow a 10-day operation in March in which missiles and bombs helped to clear an IS stronghold in the Makhmur mountain region, south-west of Erbil in northern Iraq.

An MoD spokesman said: “On Tuesday 11 May, Iraqi security forces encountered a group of Daesh terrorists in a strong defensive position some twenty five miles south west of Mosul. 

“Coming under heavy small arms fire from the terrorists, the Iraqi troops requested air support from the global coalition, and a pair of Royal Air Force Typhoon FGR4s responded promptly.

“Liaising closely with the Iraqis, our aircraft attacked the Daesh terrorists with two Paveway IV precision guided bombs. The bombs hit the target and eliminated a number of the Daesh extremists. 

“The Iraqi forces were then able to assault the position successfully and overwhelm the few remaining terrorists.”

This comes as the RAF’s new range of supersonic stealth jets will help wipe out ISIS in Iraq and Syria, military chiefs say.

F-35B Lightning II’s will operate alongside the US Marine Corps and form part of six warships escorting the £3.5 billion HMS Queen Elizabeth warship on its maiden mission.

The Ministry of Defence (MoD) has said the F35B Lightning fast jets – which can travel at speeds of 1,200mph will able to “pack a potent punch” against ISIS.

The announcement comes amid growing fears that the extremist group could be re surfacing, with significant numbers of jihadis reported to be in Iraq, Syria and other locations abroad.

Only last month, dozens of innocent people were ruthlessly killed when terrorist militants went on the rampage in the key industrial town of Palma, Africa – believed to be the new ISIS front line.

It included the discovery of missing Brit, Philip Mawer.

It has prompted Air Chief Marshal Sir Mike Wigston to claim why an offensive at the apparent heart of operations is now needed – adding that he is in no doubt that “violent extremism and the toxic ideology underpinning it is still rooted” in the region.

He said: “I’m absolutely clear in my mind that what we are doing every day is making the streets of the UK safer.”

The renowned “Dambusters” squadron, or 617 Squadron, is set to operate the jets to support the counter-IS operations in Iraq and Syria.

In total, eight RAF and 10 US Marine Corps F35B stealth fighter jets will be operating on board HMS Queen Elizabeth.

They will head for Asia accompanied by six Royal Navy ships, a submarine, 14 naval helicopters and a company of Royal Marines.

The air strikes follow a 10-day operation in March in which missiles and bombs helped to clear an IS stronghold in the Makhmur mountain region
The air strikes follow a 10-day operation in March in which missiles and bombs helped to clear an IS stronghold in the Makhmur mountain region





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